• Pesach
    A yearly Jewish feast, or holy day, recalling Israel’s exodus from Egypt and deliverance from slavery. Literally refers to the plague God sent Pharaoh that killed all the firstborn male offspring of Egypt. The application of lamb’s blood on the doorposts of Israelite homes caused the curse to “pass over” all within the households.
  • Queen of Heaven
    Easter or Ishtar, also known by her biblical name Semiramis and later called the “Queen of heaven” was the widow of Nimrod and mother of Tammuz. Easter is the bare breasted pagan fertility goddess of the east. Legend has it that she came out of heaven in a giant egg, landing in the Euphrates river at sunrise on the first Sunday after the vernal equinox, busted out, and turned a bird into an egg laying rabbit.
  • Rabbi
    Hebrew word meaning “great” or “revered,” usually referring to a Jewish man who is a teacher of the Torah. Not an occupation but a title.
  • Rhema
    Greek term for the Word of God made alive by the inspiration of the Holy Spirit.
  • Rosh Hashanah
    Hebrew for “head of the year.” First day of the Jewish calendar and a ten-day period of reflection and repentance leading to Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement.
  • Sabbath
    Shabbat in Hebrew, a day of rest on the seventh day beginning at sundown every Friday.
  • Seder
    Hebrew word for “order” or “arrangement,” but also referring to the meal and ceremony on the first and second nights of Passover.
  • Shabbat
    Hebrew word for “order” or “arrangement,” but also referring to the meal and ceremony on the first and second nights of Passover.
  • Shavuot
    Hebrew for “weeks.” Denotes the Feast of Pentecost, or the Feast of Weeks, celebrating when God gave Moses the first five books of the Old Testament on Mount Sinai.
  • Shema
    Hebrew word for “hear.” First word of the daily Jewish prayer that says, “Hear, O Israel: the Lord is our God, the Lord is One.” (See Deuteronomy 6:4.)